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The Tipping Point?

Tuesday, 8 December 2015
blog
Every once in a while, I think that we are getting somewhere. On a day when that hideous gasbag Trump trumpets that Muslims should not be permitted to enter the United States, I sat in a room full of innovative Americans to talk about carbon pricing. Every sane person and every fan of Canada's ecofiscal commission knows that we are not really going to succeed in dealing with climate change until carbon is priced properly. We are finally acting on that, with carbon taxes in British Columbia and Alberta (and lots of other good things as well in that province), and with cap and trade systems in Quebec, Ontario (soon) and Manitoba (a little later).

China’s slowdown may have halted rise in global carbon emissions

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Eric Reguly
Scientists at the Paris climate change conference have produced a rare bit of good news about planet-warming global carbon emissions: They will probably fall this year.

Manitoba signs on to carbon market with Ontario, Quebec

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Shawn Mccarthy
Manitoba has joined Ontario and Quebec in a carbon market that will allow cross-border trading of emission credits among provinces and U.S. states as premiers acknowledge that greater efforts are required to avert the worst impacts of global warming.

Why 2015’s surprisingly lower carbon emissions may still not be good news in Paris

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Tyler Hamilton
A new study has found that global CO2 emissions have virtually halted and may even fall — ever so slightly — before the end of this year, an unexpected and welcome outcome during a time of sustained economic growth. But don’t get too excited.

Global emissions projected to fall this year, despite economic growth

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Eric Regulry
Greenhouse gas emissions are rising relentlessly, with potentially catastrophic results. Or are they? On Monday, four days before the end of the Paris climate conference, scientists have produced an exceedingly rare bit of good news about planet-warming global emissions: They will probably fall this year.

COP21 at Midpoint

Monday, 7 December 2015
blog
Christopher Campbell-Duruflé
Saturday’s publication by the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP) of a new version of the draft Paris Agreement presents a good occasion to reflect on the progress accomplished since the beginning of COP21 last Monday. Having observed different work sessions, I draw attention to some of the most contentious issues that will likely be key for the coming days of negotiation. While the rumour has it that the COP21 site in Le Bourget is rented until Sunday night and that this provides delegates some additional time past the Friday night official deadline, it is clear that every hour counts to reach an effective and fair climate agreement.

Paris Agreement - To bind and how to bind, that is the question …

Monday, 7 December 2015
blog
In the lead up to and during the opening day speeches of 150 heads of state at COP21 in Paris, there were appeals for urgent and decisive action to combat climate change and exhortations for states to achieve a strong and legally binding agreement.

They Are Halfway There

Monday, 7 December 2015
blog
The Paris Conference began with a document put together by the two co-chairs, from the United States and Algeria.  It contained the seeds of an agreement, but was accompanied by the brackets and annexes that had been added by countries at the last negotiating sessions before the COP. You have to remember that paranoia reigns supreme at these sort of talks. Smaller countries and the European Union are haunted by memories of Rio, where President Obama and the leaders of China, India, Brazil, South Africa and one or two other large developing countries pulled a fast one on the world when they sat in a little open plan office in Copenhagen and cooked up an outcome that the rest of the world did not have a chance to vote on. To be fair, the whole conference had ground to a halt and was in danger of total failure and the last minute conflab probably saved the climate negotiation process; but it was neither fair nor transparent.

COP21 Exposition of an Impressionist Draft Paris Agreement

Saturday, 5 December 2015
blog
If you have ever stepped too close to Monet’s studies of Water lilies or Seurat’s studies for A Sunday on La Grande Jatte you will recognize that same dizzying confusion when you attempt to read the draft ADP texts released in the last two days (three versions released on December 4, followed by a December 5 Draft Paris Agreement approved by the negotiators for the 195 State parties minutes before the Saturday noon deadline).

What’s really at stake in Paris?

Friday, 4 December 2015
blog
What’s really at stake in Paris can be neatly summed up in one sentence: how can we provide a decent standard of living for 9 billion people by 2050, while reducing our greenhouse gases (GHGs) by at least seventy-five percent?
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