skip to main content skip to main navigation skip to footer
Main Content

Climate Change

Filter materials by type

Climate Change and Sustainable Cities | Inside the Issues 6.6

Wednesday, 16 March 2016
video
In episode six of season six, CIGI Senior Fellow Sarah Burch joins CIGI Senior Fellow and co-host Andrew Thompson for a discussion on what the Paris Climate Agreement means for sustainable cities.

Trudeau’s Rope-a-Dope Strategy to Win on Climate Change

Wednesday, 16 March 2016
blog
I don’t know if Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a recreational boxer, approaches politics like he’s in the ring. But he appears to be using a classic boxing strategy in confronting the opponents of a national carbon price: allow them to flail in the early rounds, and then knocking them out when they’ve tired.

Prepare for a future without oil sands, CIGI Senior Fellow Jeff Rubin urges policy makers

Tuesday, 15 March 2016
article
Jeff Rubin, one of Canada’s best known economists and a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), has a stark warning for Canadian policy makers: Start shifting away from reliance on oil and gas production now or pay the economic consequences in a carbon-constrained world. In a CIGI paper released today, “The Future of Canada’s Oil Sands in a Decarbonizing Global Economy,” Rubin predicts that as climate change compels a deep decarbonization of the global economy, emission restrictions around the world will destroy demand for billions of barrels of oil over the coming decades, severely impairing the economic viability of high-cost producers like those located in Canada’s oil patch.

The Future of Canada's Oil Sands in a Decarbonizing Global Economy

Tuesday, 15 March 2016
publication
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Alberta premier Rachel Notley have both argued that improving Canada’s emissions record will safeguard the future development of the oil sands. The perspective offers little recognition of the current problems facing the country’s largest energy resource, and even less recognition of the problems that the oil sands will encounter as a result of actions taken by other countries to limit their own carbon emissions as pledged recently at the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. As climate change compels deep decarbonization of the global economy, emission restrictions around the world will destroy demand for billions of barrels of oil over the coming decades, severely impairing the economic viability of high-cost producers.

Where Do the Oil Sands Fit in a Low-Carbon Future?

Monday, 14 March 2016
article
Oil sands producers may have collectively breathed a sigh of relief on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s recent failure to get the premiers signing on to a national price for carbon emissions. However, domestic measures to reduce carbon emissions are the least of oil sands producers’ concerns when it comes to how actions to mitigate climate change will challenge their industry’s survival.

News Analysis: First ministers' climate deal is easy to mock but harder to dismiss

Friday, 4 March 2016
article
Bruce Cheadle
If 80 per cent of life is just showing up, in politics the total is probably closer to 90. Canada's first ministers emerged from two days of talks this week with an agreement on a plan to develop a framework for climate policy action. It would be easy to mock. But serious observers who study the difficult politics and policy of climate change believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the provincial and territorial leaders did more than just show up at the Vancouver Convention Centre.

How a national carbon policy would benefit Canadians and send the world a message

Wednesday, 2 March 2016
article
This week’s premiers meeting must include carbon pricing — a trade-savvy approach that shows global leadership in tackling emissions while advancing Canada's green economy.

Growth, Innovation and COP 21: The Case for New Investment In Innovation Infrastructure

Wednesday, 2 March 2016
publication
Forged by private and public sector cooperation, Mission Innovation was announced at the twenty-first Conference of the Parties (COP21) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change as a commitment to doubling, by 2020, the investment in energy innovation by participating countries. Mission Innovation heralds a new period of active private-public sector engagement on energy, climate and innovation policy.

Worrisome gaps in the Paris agreement

Saturday, 13 February 2016
article
CIGI Senior Fellow David Estrin's commentary on the Paris Agreement was published today in the Dhaka Tribune.

Ban Ki-moon’s visit to Ottawa marks renewed ties with UN

Wednesday, 10 February 2016
article
Michelle Zilio
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is expected to press Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for more details about a multibillion-dollar Canadian pledge to help developing countries fight climate change when they meet in Ottawa on Thursday as part of an effort to forge a new relationship after years of Conservative government neglect.
Footer Content