skip to main content skip to main navigation skip to footer
Main Content

Climate Change

Filter materials by type

CIGI experts comment on outcomes of COP21 and Paris Agreement

Sunday, 13 December 2015
article
Waterloo, Ontario — As the twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties (COP21) comes to a close, the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) releases insights from its international law and global economy and politics experts regarding the outcomes, including the final Paris Agreement released on Saturday, December 12.

Canada faces tough realities to reach Paris climate change target

Sunday, 13 December 2015
article
Shawn McCarthy, Bill Curry
After this weekend’s historic global accord in Paris, Ottawa’s climate-change focus now turns to reaching a detailed national climate strategy with the provinces by early March while also moving toward a North American agreement on energy and environmental issues.

The Road from Paris COP21: An epic journey begins

Sunday, 13 December 2015
blog
The Paris Agreement on Climate Change is the culmination of the year in which the global community seems to have come of age and recognized its interconnectedness, and the importance of linking development, human rights and sustainability. The Addis Ababa Action Plan, the Sustainable Development Goals and the new Paris Agreement, all concluded this year, embrace principles of solidarity, equity and sustainability and reframe intractably complex issues as matters of common concern for all human kind to resolve together in a spirit of sharing and cooperation.

The End of the Beginning

Saturday, 12 December 2015
blog
Before the Paris climate talks, I wrote a brief note for CIGI quoting Churchill's famous phrase about a decisive battle not being the end, nor even the beginning of the end. It was, rather, the end of the beginning.

Who Will Pay?

Friday, 11 December 2015
blog
As might have been expected before the talks began, reports on the eve of the expected conclusion of the Paris climate change negotiations suggest that the talks have become bogged down over who will pay the costs of adaptation. (See The New York Times, here.) Advanced countries want the rising middle-income countries, China and India particularly, to share more of the burden. Poor and emerging nations, which will likely incur the greatest costs of climate change, should do more to address the problem they argue.

The Calm before (or after?) the Storm

Friday, 11 December 2015
blog
While there are informal talks still going on and the whole thing could collapse like a house of cards, there is a pretty complete, literate version of the final document that has been circulated by the French Presidency. It has few brackets in it, which means that the French have been quietly speaking with all of the groupings about their removal, or that they have finally put down a démarche. Agree with this or object at your peril. The latter is very likely, but I still think that we are in good shape.

Paris Agreement: Preamble, Cooperation, Loss and Damage, and Forests

Thursday, 10 December 2015
blog
Christopher Campbell-Duruflé
The French presidency of COP21 released Wednesday afternoon a new draft of the Paris Agreement, based on the input of the different facilitating ministers mandated to synthesize the concerns of their counterparts and bring down the December 5 text from 20 to 14 pages. Canadian Minister Catherine McKenna, for instance, was in charge of improving the text on cooperative approaches to climate change mitigation under article 3. This new version was discussed at length on the same evening as a plenary meeting of the Paris Committee of environment ministers, which this author had a chance to witness.

The Tipping Point?

Tuesday, 8 December 2015
blog
Every once in a while, I think that we are getting somewhere. On a day when that hideous gasbag Trump trumpets that Muslims should not be permitted to enter the United States, I sat in a room full of innovative Americans to talk about carbon pricing. Every sane person and every fan of Canada's ecofiscal commission knows that we are not really going to succeed in dealing with climate change until carbon is priced properly. We are finally acting on that, with carbon taxes in British Columbia and Alberta (and lots of other good things as well in that province), and with cap and trade systems in Quebec, Ontario (soon) and Manitoba (a little later).

China’s slowdown may have halted rise in global carbon emissions

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Eric Reguly
Scientists at the Paris climate change conference have produced a rare bit of good news about planet-warming global carbon emissions: They will probably fall this year.

Manitoba signs on to carbon market with Ontario, Quebec

Monday, 7 December 2015
article
Shawn Mccarthy
Manitoba has joined Ontario and Quebec in a carbon market that will allow cross-border trading of emission credits among provinces and U.S. states as premiers acknowledge that greater efforts are required to avert the worst impacts of global warming.
Footer Content