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Canada and China deepening economic ties by embarking on possible free trade deal

Thursday, 22 September 2016
article
Damon van der Linde
With the resolution of key trade disputes, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and China’s Premier Li Keqiang signalled deepening economic ties between the two countries, opening the door to the possibility of a free trade agreement.

Bold measures needed to lift global growth

Wednesday, 21 September 2016
article
Global growth is now being stuck in a “mediocre” plateau, but no one seems to bother. World growth risks getting trapped in the 2%-3% range it’s been in since 2010. The International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde has derided the level as “the new mediocre” compared with the 3.6% average in the five years leading to the 2008-09 global recession. Here is the prevailing situation.

G20: Time to end the circus

Monday, 12 September 2016
article
Mike Callaghan
The dust has settled on another G20 summit, the latest held in Hangzhou, China. The small group of think tanks who follow the G20 are disappointed with the outcomes. What’s new? The G20 has been a disappointment for a number of years. Perhaps it’s time to reflect on what works and what doesn’t in the G20.

Energy in the G20 Finance Track: G20 Energy Transformation during the German Presidency

Friday, 9 September 2016
publication
Climate change and the now largely market-driven transformation of the energy sector create financial stress in the fossil fuel and nuclear industries as well as in countries that export fossil commodities or will have obsolete nuclear plants on their territory. The risks are systemic and may lead to contagion or knock-on effects that could destabilize the global financial system. In consequence, energy should no longer be left primarily to the Group of Twenty “Sherpa track,” but should be included prominently in the “finance track” as a matter for finance ministers and central bank governors.

For the Agenda of the German G20 Presidency: A Global Sovereign Debt Restructuring Regime

Friday, 9 September 2016
publication
The Group of Twenty (G20) has expanded the global financial safety net, but failed to align access criteria and sovereign debt restructuring requirements across its various players and layers. International crisis lending is now fragmented and lacks a consistent and credible regime for sovereign debt restructuring. The German G20 presidency is uniquely positioned to address these issues.

A US$24b summit about a staircase: lessons for Germany and the 2017 G20 leaders

Friday, 9 September 2016
article
Tristram Sainsbury
Despite China’s efforts, the 2016 G20 summit will probably be remembered for poor communications and a lack of action.

Despite calls for action, G20 yields little more than talk

Friday, 9 September 2016
article
The Hangzhou summit presented G20 leaders with the chance to reassure citizens that they are on top of the world’s pressing challenges, but this was an opportunity they failed to grasp.

Canada is primed for an exporting boom. So why isn’t it happening?

Friday, 9 September 2016
article
For as long as he’s been governor of the Bank of Canada, Stephen Poloz has been promising that exports would replace commodities and housing the driver of economic growth. The “rotation,” took longer than he expected it would, but finally, two months ago, Poloz declared victory. “The export recovery is alive and well,” he said.

Why the G20 Must Also Act as a Forum for Climate Action

Wednesday, 7 September 2016
blog
As the 2016 Hangzhou G20 came to a close on Sunday, there was a bit of good news for mitigating climate change. The world’s two largest emitters, the US and China, have jointly confirmed the ratification of the Paris Agreement, a commitment that brings the number of ratifications closer to the threshold of 55 countries accounting for 55 per cent of global carbon emissions required for the legal agreement to enter into force.

Will the G20 Remain Relevant?

Wednesday, 7 September 2016
article
The G20 first met at leaders level in 2008 in response to the unfolding global economic crisis. However, the G20 first came into being in 1999 at the level of finance ministers when Canada’s Paul Martin convinced his fellow G7 finance ministers, in the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis, that a larger grouping was needed to further global economic leadership and cooperation.
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