The International Law Research Program (ILRP) at the Centre for International Governance Innovation looks for legal solutions to governance challenges. Through its different research areas — intellectual property law and innovation, Indigenous law and traditional knowledge, international economic law and environmental law — the ILRP examines how the rule of law can help to advance a more progressive, prosperous, sustainable and equitable global society.

In this video, we explain how the ILRP uses a unique logic model to guide its work. The model — a process of consultation, research, partnership, mentorship, engagement and dialogue — allows for ideas to become action.

Transcript

In our increasingly complex world, we need policy ideas to tackle the challenges that come with globalization. We often think of economic and technological solutions as part of the equation to solve these problems.

But how often do we consider the law as a tool to address global challenges?

In an ever more interconnected world, global law and governance will shape how we respond to economic, technological, environmental and human rights challenges.

As a part of the Centre for International Governance Innovation, the International Law Research Program goes beyond researching legal solutions and aims to influence policy.

The ILRP examines how international law can help us to advance a more progressive, prosperous, sustainable and equitable global society. Research areas include intellectual property law and innovation, Indigenous law and traditional knowledge, international economic law and environmental law.

Whatever the research area, everything the ILRP undertakes follows a unique logic model.  Let’s look at how our process works, from idea to action.

To assess how the law can help tackle a particular policy problem, such as aligning international trade law with climate change commitments, we first talk to different stakeholders with varying priorities, to learn from their perspectives.

For example, as countries take actions to slow climate change, this may impact or restrict trade. A better understanding of international trade law can help countries meet their trade obligations while tackling climate change commitments made under the Paris Agreement.

After gathering information through these consultations, we bring together a team of partners and leading legal scholars from around the world to further our research. 

As we explore ideas, the ILRP also welcomes SJD and PhD law students, offering them the unique opportunity to be mentored by leading experts and to test their research ideas in a dynamic, collaborative environment. We foster a skilled and diverse international law workforce here in Canada, capable of playing a leadership role internationally.

The combination of consultation, research, partnership and mentorship results in innovative policy ideas presented through research papers, special reports, books, policy briefs, opinion pieces, multimedia, conferences and side events at international meetings.

We also meet with decision makers to share our ideas and work to implement them.

These outputs also enhance the public’s understanding of how international law is relevant in their daily lives.

It is through this model of consultation, research, partnership, mentorship, engagement and dialogue that the International Law Research Program at CIGI conducts all its activities with the goal of creating legal solutions that will make our world more progressive, prosperous, sustainable and equitable.

For media inquires, usage rights or other questions please contact CIGI.
The opinions expressed in this article/multimedia are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of CIGI or its Board of Directors.
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