Security Sector Reform Monitor

About the series

The Security Sector Reform Monitor is a quarterly publication that tracks developments and trends in the ongoing security sector reform (SSR) processes of five countries: Afghanistan, Burundi, East Timor, Haiti and South Sudan. Every quarter, there will be separate editions for each case study country. Adopting a holistic definition of the security sector, the Monitor will cover a wide range of actors, topics and themes, from reforms in the rule of law institutions and armed forces to demilitarization activities and the role of non-statutory security and justice actors.

In the Series

The referendum vote on self-determination held this month in Southern Sudan marks an important step toward political stability and development in a country historically marred by war and confrontation between the north and the south. The fourth edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Southern Sudan discusses the tensions that existed among various factions before the April 2010 election and considers the potential for violence during and after the January referendum. This Monitor answers questions regarding the future of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement, examines possible new political alliances between the north and Southern Sudan, and considers the possibility for ethnic violence against Southern Sudanese living in the north if the south secedes.
The fourth edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Timor-Leste discusses the negative impact presidential pardons have had on the development of the justice system, the broader security sector and the country’s future stability.
The formal justice system in Timor-Leste, a key component in rebuilding the country’s security sector, is still in a developing state. It continues to face numerous challenges — unequal access to the formal justice system, a continuing reliance on traditional justice mechanisms in some communities, problems with judicial training and language issues. The ongoing backlog of prosecution cases has contributed to public distrust of the formal justice system and affected police credibility. The third edition of the Security Sector Reform: Timor-Leste examines the justice sector’s development and progress, and considers its future — the consensus being that serious issues remain to be resolved.
The third edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Southern Sudan examines the endemic corruption that has emerged in Southern Sudan after a prolonged civil war. In contrast to the many researchers who claim that corruption is embedded in Sudanese society, this edition of the Monitor suggests that the situation in Southern Sudan is a result of the creation of an entirely new government and a lack of adequate mechanisms for economic governance and accountability.
The fourth edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Burundi focuses on oversight and democratic control of the security sector. It looks closely at the creation and development of Burundi’s new army, and the specific challenges it faces in managing demobilization, disarmament and reintegration and professionalizing and training its members.
The fourth edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Afghanistan investigates efforts to enhance the rule of law, arguing that reforms been burdened by unrealistic expectations for the pace of institutional reform and public acceptance, questionable claims regarding the short-term efficacy of judicial reform as a stabilizing element in a counterinsurgency environment and reluctant or mismanaged engagement with traditional justice structures.
The third edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Burundi focuses on oversight and democratic control of the security sector. The report highlights the internal oversight mechanisms of the national police and armed forces, as well as the work of independent oversight bodies like the ombudsman, the parliament, civil society, and the judiciary. The report urges Burundian authorities to find the political will to consolidate and build on recent gains in transparency and accountability.

This Security Sector Reform Monitor: Afghanistan edition examines trends in SSR in the context of an increasingly pressurized security environment and a rapidly expanding zone of military operations, with an emphasis on the ANSF's role in the present counter-insurgency strategy and its relationship with the Afghan public.
This edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Timor-Leste examines the rise of national government ownership of the security sector reform (SSR) process. The report examines Timor-Leste's draft National Security Policy and new legislative framework for the security sector.
The second edition of the Security Sector Reform Monitor: Southern Sudan outlines the challenges that non-state armed groups and the proliferation of small arms and light weapons pose to the nascent security sector of Southern Sudan. The Monitor analyzes efforts at civilian disarmament to date, and suggests that a new approach to the problem, based on community engagement rather than coercion, should be encouraged.