The global economic crisis presents regulators and international institutions with a set of challenges of systemic magnitude, including the need to reform regulatory systems, review systemic shortcomings, and devise new models of governance for today's global economic realities. The crisis has deepened challenges to the Anglo-American model and led to calls to remake the international financial architecture. It has provoked questions such as: what new rules are necessary to bring the crisis to an end; which organizations should be responsible for enforcing the new rules; which nations need to be represented in the regulatory bodies; which conflicts exist between international and national governance models?

This presentation will discuss the challenges that Emerging Powers present to the traditional G7 powers in global coordination. Primary attention will be given to the role of China and the Asian region – a locus of international attention and contestation in the current discussions.

About the speaker:


Gregory Chin is Assistant Professor of Political Science, York University, and a Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). He teaches global politics and East Asian political economy. Previously, he served as First Secretary in the Canadian Embassy Beijing, responsible for foreign aid to China and North Korea. His current research focuses on China's global expansion, East Asian regionalism, and the international financial architecture. He has published recently in Journal of International Affairs (Columbia University/SISA), Foreign Policy, and Far Eastern Economic Review.

He is currently completing a book-length study of China’s automotive modernization (PalgraveMacmillan). He is a member of the Global Governance Research Group headed by Chatham House, CIGI and the Instituto Affari Internazionali.


Sponsored by the York University Department of Political Science and the York Centre for Asian Research.

Event Speakers

Gregory Chin

Former CIGI China Research Chair and Senior Fellow