About the lecture:

Mr. Copeland will argue that if development has become the new security in the age of globalization, then diplomacy must displace defence at the centre of international policy. Diplomacy, however, is chronically under-resourced and has been marginalized, largely as a result of its inability to adapt to the challenges of the 21st century, many of which are rooted in science and driven by technology. Along with the other components of the diplomatic ecosystem, the foreign ministry and foreign service, diplomacy, if it is to regain its relevance and effectiveness, must be reformed from the ground up.

This lecture is co-sponsored by CIGI and the Canadian International Council (CIC).

 About the speaker:

Daryl Copeland is an analyst, author and educator specializing in diplomacy, foreign policy, global issues and public management. His first book, Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations, was released in July, 2009 by Lynne Rienner Publishers.

From 1981 to 2009 Mr. Copeland served as a Canadian diplomat with postings in Thailand, Ethiopia, New Zealand and Malaysia. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was elected a record five times to the Executive Committee of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers. From 1996-99 he was National Program Director of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs in Toronto and Editor of Behind the Headlines, Canada’s international affairs magazine. In 2000, he received the Canadian Foreign Service Officer Award for his “tireless dedication and unyielding commitment to advancing the interests of the diplomatic profession.”

Among his positions at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa, Mr. Copeland has worked as Deputy Director for International Communications; Director for Southeast Asia; Senior Advisor, Public Diplomacy; Director of Strategic Communications Services; and, Senior Advisor, Strategic Policy and Planning.

Mr. Copeland’s institutional affiliations include the University of Toronto’s Munk Centre for International Studies as a Senior Fellow, and the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy as a Research Fellow.

Mr. Copeland grew up in downtown Toronto, and received his formal education at the University of Western Ontario (Gold Medal, Political Science; Chancellor’s Prize, Social Sciences) and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Canada Council Special MA Scholarship).

For more information and a complete bibliography, see: www.guerrilladiplomacy.com