The intellectual property and new digital trade chapters of NAFTA are emerging as among the most contentious aspects of its renegotiation.  For decades, consumers, advocates and technology companies have been stuck in a defensive posture, criticizing more restrictive trade provisions and efforts to impose domestic reforms through trade negotiations. In recent years, however, these groups have been increasingly effective at promoting a positive agenda, including obligations to promote copyright “balance” and protect user rights that underpin the Internet ecosystem. 

In this Global Policy Forum presentation, University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist discusses the implications of using trade agreements to govern intellectual property. He describes how a positive, pro-innovation and balanced digital agenda in NAFTA could be achieved.

Launched in 2012 by the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), and held at the Rideau Club in Ottawa, the CIGI Global Policy Forum offers audience members access to a wide range of distinguished speakers: policy experts and influencers shaping the world's debates and discussions on global economic, security, development and environmental issues.
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