James A. Haley is a CIGI senior fellow and executive director for the Canadian-led constituency at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, DC. He served as Canada’s executive director to the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC from 2012 to 2015. Prior to this appointment, he held a number of senior positions in Canada’s Department of Finance, most recently as a general director at the Economic and Fiscal Policy Branch. In that position, he represented Canada at a meeting of the Working Party 3 and the Economic Policy Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. As general director of the International Trade and Finance Branch, he alson served as co-chair of the G20 working group on rebalancing the global economy and represented Canada in numerous international working groups.

From 2003 to 2006, he was research director at the International Department of the Bank of Canada. In this capacity he advised the governor and deputy governor on international economic and financial market developments, external imbalances, IMF reform and related policy issues. From 1993 to 1996, he was a senior economist in the research and European departments of the IMF. James obtained his B.A. in economics from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, and received his graduate training in economics at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He has lectured on macroeconomics, international finance and international financial institutions at the McCourt School of Public Policy, Georgetown University and the Norman Patterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University. His published work has focused on international financial issues, the IMF and sovereign debt restructuring.

Program

Opinions

Opinion

Trump is a Black Swan

The Age of Disruption: A series about the risks to globalization and the postwar order as the 45th president of the United States is inaugurated

Multimedia

Events

Notable Media

Haley, James A 2012 "Greece's moment of truth and the G20's challenge," The Globe and Mail February 21

In the News