In recent years, an increased amount of attention has been paid to solar radiation management (SRM), a sub-set of techniques for climate engineering. SRM techniques seek to actively manage the radiation balance of the Earth on a planetary scale in order to forestall the effects of anthropogenic climate change.

Throughout 2014 and into early 2015, a series of workshops with selected SRM experts examined and developed ways in which procedural governance can be further employed to ensure cooperation, information disclosure, transparency and assessment especially in light of various concerns about the risks that such activities may present to the environment and about their complex social and political implications. The goal of these workshops were to assist decision-makers and other interested parties in understanding the complex scientific and social issues that proposals for SRM field experiments and their regulation must navigate by highlighting the tensions between these concerns and suggesting some initial steps that might be taken to address them.

About the Author

Neil Craik is a CIGI senior fellow with the International Law Research Program, effective June 2015. He is an associate professor at the University of Waterloo with appointments to the Balsillie School of International Affairs and the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development, where he teaches and researches in the fields of international and Canadian environmental law.