Elusive Pursuits cover image
ISBN-10: 978-1-928096-11-5 ISBN-13: 978-1-928096-12-2

Elusive Pursuits: Lessons from Canada’s Interventions Abroad is the 29th volume of the influential Canada Among Nations series. This book examines Canada’s role in foreign military and security missions, and its tendency to intervene under the auspices of international institutions. Canada is not just among nations in these efforts, but in nations on a regular basis.

Table of Contents

Preface Rohinton Medhora and Dane Rowlands

Foreword Hugh Segal

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Introduction: Learning Lessons from Canada’s Interventions
Fen Osler Hampson and Stephen M. Saideman

Part One — Interventions: Lessons Learned

Mandating  Responsibility:  International  Legal  Lessons  from  the  Military Intervention in Libya
Christopher K. Penny

Navigating Troubled Waters: Canada in the Arab World
Marie-Joëlle Zahar

Lessons Learned?: Public Opinion and the Afghanistan Mission 
Jean-Christophe Boucher and Kim Richard Nossal

Canada and Somalia: Learning from the Legacy of Failed Intervention
Aisha Ahmad

Living among the Population in Southern Afghanistan: A Canadian Approach to Counter-insurgency
Caroline Leprince

Securing the Pearl of the Caribbean: The Canadian Contribution to Haiti’s Security and Stability, 2004–2014
Gaëlle Rivard Piché

Part Two — The Domestic Side of Intervention

Canada’s Development Interventions: Unpacking Motives and Effectiveness in Canadian Foreign Aid
Stephen Brown

The Gender Turn in Canadian Military Interventions
Stéfanie von Hlatky

Part Three — Responsibility to Protect

Syria and the Responsibility to Protect
Jane Boulden

The Call of Duty: Harper’s Doctrine on Military Intervention 
Derek Burney, Fen Osler Hampson and Simon Palamar

Geriatric Interventions: The Demographic Horizon of Collective Security
Christian Leuprecht

Contributors

About the Author

Fen Hampson is a distinguished fellow and director of the Global Security & Politics program, overseeing the research direction of the program and related activities. Previously, he served as director of the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and will continue to serve as chancellor’s professor at Carleton University. He is the recipient of various awards and honours and is a frequent contributor to the national and international media.