By virtue of the constitutional division of powers into federal and provincial jurisdictions, the governance of the provision of cyber security in Canada — and in comparable federal systems with constitutionally distinct levels of government, such as the United States and Australia — raises a host of policy-making challenges.

This special report’s authors ponder the division of authority and responsibility — for cyber, in general, and cyber security, in particular — between public and private actors and different levels of government. Drawing on expertise and insights from business, law, policy and academia, they posit normative models of cyber security governance and gauge the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. Their contributions illuminate some preliminary lessons for policy makers striving to improve governance outcomes across the cyber domain in Canada.

This special report was produced by CIGI in collaboration with the the Smart Cybersecurity Network (SERENE-RISC), a knowledge mobilization network funded by Canada’s National Centres of Excellence.

 

  • David Mussington is a senior fellow at CIGI, and professor of the practice and director, Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise, University of Maryland, College Park. 

  • Benoît Dupont is a professor of criminology at the Université de Montréal, where he also holds the Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity. 

  • Christian Leuprecht (Ph.D., Queen’s) is Class of 1965 Professor in Leadership, Department of Political Science and Economics, Royal Military College (RMC). He is cross-appointed to the Department of Political Studies and the School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University, where he is affiliated with both the Queen’s Centre for International and Defence Policy and the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations. He is also adjunct research professor, Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security, Charles Sturt University. A recipient of RMC’s Cowan Prize for Excellence in Research and an elected member of the College of New Scholars of the Royal Society of Canada, Christian is also a Munk senior fellow in security and defence at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. He has held visiting positions in North America (Bicentennial Chair in Canadian Studies, Yale University), Europe (Eisenhower Fellow, NATO Defense College) and Australia (Matthew Flinders Fellow, Flinders University), and is regularly called as an expert witness to testify before committees of Parliament. He holds appointments to the board of the German Institute for Defence and Strategic Studies and the Police Services Board of the city of Kingston.

  • Christian Leuprecht (Ph.D., Queen’s) is Class of 1965 Professor in Leadership, Department of Political Science and Economics, Royal Military College (RMC). He is cross-appointed to the Department of Political Studies and the School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University, where he is affiliated with both the Queen’s Centre for International and Defence Policy and the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations. He is also adjunct research professor, Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security, Charles Sturt University. A recipient of RMC’s Cowan Prize for Excellence in Research and an elected member of the College of New Scholars of the Royal Society of Canada, Christian is also a Munk senior fellow in security and defence at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. He has held visiting positions in North America (Bicentennial Chair in Canadian Studies, Yale University), Europe (Eisenhower Fellow, NATO Defense College) and Australia (Matthew Flinders Fellow, Flinders University), and is regularly called as an expert witness to testify before committees of Parliament. He holds appointments to the board of the German Institute for Defence and Strategic Studies and the Police Services Board of the city of Kingston.

  • Stephanie MacLellan is a digital democracy fellow with the Public Policy Forum.