Mutual Security in the Asia-Pacific: Roles for Australia, Canada and South Korea

Published:
December 10, 2015
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Myriad challenges to regional stability and security threaten East Asia’s burgeoning growth and prosperity. Mutual Security in the Asia-Pacific: Roles for Australia, Canada and South Korea addresses the economic and security challenges that loom in the region and the role that these three countries can play to ensure a stable, predictable political environment.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword: Constructive Powers and Regional Security in the Asia-Pacific - Ambassador Leonard J. Edwards and Ambassador Yim Sung-joon

Introduction: Constructive Powers in a Deconstructed Region - James Manicom and Simon Palamar

PART ONE: SECURITY CHALLENGES AND THE REGIONAL RESPONSE

An Assessment of the Security Environment in Northeast Asia: A South Korean Perspective
Kang Choi and Gibum Kim

A Constructive Contribution to Non-traditional Security Challenges: Areas for Australia-Canada-South Korea Cooperation
Hayley Channer

Conflict Prevention in the Asia-Pacific
Fen Osler Hampson and James Manicom

PART TWO: CONSTRUCTIVE POWERS AND THEIR REGIONAL AGENDA

South Korea as an Emerging Constructive Power: Issue Leadership and Limits
Benoit Hardy-Chartrand

Will Canada Be a Constructive Power in East Asia?
Simon Palamar

Australia: A Constructive or a Confused Power?
Andrew Carr

PART THREE: CONSTRUCTIVE POWERS COOPERATION IN REGIONAL SECURITY

Rule Making for State Conduct in the Attribution of Cyber Attacks
Samantha Bradshaw, Mark Raymond and Aaron Shull

Friends, Allies and Partners: The Past, Present and Future of Canada-Korea Defence Relations (1950–2015)
Tina Jiwon Park

CONTRIBUTORS

About the Editor

Kang Choi is the vice president of research and director of the Center for Foreign Policy and National Security at the Asan Institute of Policy Studies.